Raffa Learning Community
Raffa Learning Community
Raffa Learning Community

Learning Community is the key to success.

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​Welcome to Raffa’s Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast.

​​​​The series, which has grown out of our Raffa Learning Community effort, features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More.

You can listen here, on our blog or subscribe via iTunes​.

 
If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com​ and include "podcast" in the email subject line.

Podcast

  • 6/23/2018 Ep. 29 – What do Maryland companies have to be excited about?

    Tami Howie, CEO, MD Tech Council has lots to share! In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Sharon Tiger, Director of Business Development at Raffa Financial Services talks with Tami Howie, CEO, MD Tech Council about the benefits of being a part of the council.

    Tami Howie, CEO, MD Tech Council has lots to share!

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Sharon Tiger, Director of Business Development at Raffa Financial Services talks with Tami Howie, CEO, MD Tech Council about the benefits of being a part of the council.

    Tami Howie and Sharon Tiger

    If you have any questions about how Raffa Financial Services can help your business, please contact Sharon Tiger at sharon@raffafinancial.com.

    Listen Now

  • 6/21/2018 Ep. 28 – Disaster Recovery vs. Business Continuity

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Nate Solloway, Director of Raffa’s Managed Technology Services and Kerry Mickelson, CIO for Hire, discuss the difference between something happened to my data and I have to stay in business versus something happened to my building and I have to stay in business.

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Nate Solloway, Director of Raffa’s Managed Technology Services and Kerry Mickelson, CIO for Hire, discuss the difference between something happened to my data and I have to stay in business versus something happened to my building and I have to stay in business.

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  • 5/30/2018 Ep. 27 – Navigating Change – Impact on Our Mission

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Karen Schuler, Managing Director at Raffa is joined once again by Tony Cancelosi, President and CEO of Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind. Change is ever present, we see it happening quickly.  Join Karen and Tony as they discuss how change impacts our organizations and our missions.

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Karen Schuler, Managing Director at Raffa is joined once again by Tony Cancelosi, President and CEO of Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind. Change is ever present, we see it happening quickly.  Join Karen and Tony as they discuss how change impacts our organizations and our missions.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    If you have any questions about how Raffa can help your organization with strategic or succession planning, please contact Karen Schuler at kschuler@raffa.com.

    Listen Now

  • 4/24/2018 Ep. 26 – Successful Government Contracting: It’s the People and the Systems

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Sharon Tiger, Vice President of Business Development at Raffa Financial Services and Glenn Anstead, a partner in Raffa’s technology practice, discuss government contracting and their rules and regulations.

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Sharon Tiger, Vice President of Business Development at Raffa Financial Services and Glenn Anstead, a partner in Raffa’s technology practice, discuss government contracting and their rules and regulations.

    Glenn recommends that an organization implement the correct system required by a contract before winning the actual work. There is an advantage if the organization already has the correct system in place, and Sharon notes that it “cuts out some of the snags” that might come up later. PodcastCoverArt

    Glenn continues by noting that challenges may arise if the staff does not understand the new uniform guidance. If the org doesn’t “run it correctly, [your org] can be seen as deficient.”

    Glenn identifies two areas to ensure that the new uniform guidance is used correctly and efficiently: bringing the right people on board and implementing the right system to support the organization.

    The need for a compliant system is key. Glenn relates the idea to that of a Swiss Army knife – an organization should use a system that is specifically designed for government contracting, rather than a system that can merely work with government contracting.

    Furthermore, Sharon and Glenn discuss the use of a dashboard and its importance. Ensuring that the system is flexible and runs smoothly is highly important. If this is not the case, Glenn states that it might be “time to look at a new system.”

    Sharon leaves us with some fun “would you rather” questions – a great way to end the podcast.

    Tune in for helpful guidance and some laughs!

    If you would like to learn more about government contracting systems, contact Glenn Anstead at ganstead@raffa.com or 301-279-6503.

     

     

    Listen Now

  • 3/27/2018 Ep. 25 – Benefit Corps and the B Assessment: How to Align Your Business Mission With Impactful Results

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Joe Weedon of Raffa discusses the importance of Benefit Corporations and the B Assessment with Mark Frieden, President of Crossbow Strategies. They talk about how and why companies are able to do well by doing good, starting from within their organization.

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Joe Weedon of Raffa discusses the importance of Benefit Corporations and the B Assessment with Mark Frieden, President of Crossbow Strategies. They talk about how and why companies are able to do well by doing good, starting from within their organization.

    Mark starts us off by discussing what exactly a B Corporation entails, as well as how companies can become certified. He mentions the importance of B Corporations and how they are able to better treat their employees by providing good benefits and a fair amount of time to dedicate to volunteer work.

    Benefit Corporations also attract suitable employees “who are aligned with the mission,” according to Joe, as many who aim to work at these companies value the positive qualities of B Corporations.

    Furthermore, the B Assessment is explained in detail. It is nothing short of a rigorous process, but Mark affirms that it is worth the work. He credits Tom Raffa as describing the process as “a good housekeeping seal of approval for the entire company, not…just a product.”

    Joe and Mark tie up the episode by discussing upcoming events as well as the importance of networking with B Corporations. B Local Mid-Atlantic is hosting a happy hour on Tuesday, April 3rd. These events are open to anyone who might be interested in learning about local business.

    Joe leaves us with the notion that B Corporations must “give a percentage back to the community” and Mark indicates that the company can “make…small changes over time [to] improve the value of your business.” Head to the B Corp website to learn more.

    Listen Now

  • 2/26/2018 Ep. 24 – Millennials in the Nonprofit Space – Making an Impact in Your Organization

    In this episode of Raffa’s Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Rachel Caldwell, Communications and Marketing Specialist at Raffa, connects with Emma Strother, the Development Manager at LearnServe International. This episode is the first in our millennial podcast series.    

    Rachel-and-Emma-PodcastIn this episode of Raffa’s Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Rachel Caldwell, Communications and Marketing Specialist at Raffa, connects with Emma Strother, the Development Manager at LearnServe International. This episode is the first in our millennial podcast series.

     

     

     

     

    Emma’s experience working in a nonprofit is not exactly typical. As a high school student, Emma participated in LearnServe’s program. Now, as the Development Manager at LearnServe, She has firsthand experience as to how a nonprofit can make an impact. In true “Raffa form,” she is able to use her experience as a catalyst to do more.

    Emma discusses how being an “alumna” of her workplace is helpful and allows her to have an even deeper connection with her organization. She provides her background, alludes to how you can make a difference, and suggests how to manage feeling overwhelmed by today’s social challenges.

    Listen to the podcast to find out how millennials can take ownership in the nonprofit workplace and be on the lookout for future episodes in the series!

    Listen Now

  • 11/30/2017 Ep. 22 – Nonprofit Executive Transitions: Insights on Success

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Karen Schuler, Managing Director of Raffa’s Search, Transition and Planning practice and Tom Adams, Director at Raffa will focus on how the thinking around nonprofit executive transitions has broadened and what that means for boards and executives by looking at the connection between them. For more regarding […]

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Karen Schuler, Managing Director of Raffa’s Search, Transition and Planning practice and Tom Adams, Director at Raffa will focus on how the thinking around nonprofit executive transitions has broadened and what that means for boards and executives by looking at the connection between them.

    For more regarding this topic, check out the article Seven Lessons for Boards Facing Executive Transition and listen to all of our podcasts.

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  • 10/25/2017 Ep. 21 – Millennials Making a Difference: The Younger Generation in the Nonprofit Sector

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, the hot topic of “Millennials in Nonprofits” is addressed. Raffa’s Marketing Coordinator, Rachel Caldwell, and ABCD & Company’s Partner, Durecia Moorer highlight how hiring millennials in the nonprofit sector can be beneficial in a multitude of ways.

    rachel podcast 2.jpgIn this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, the hot topic of “Millennials in Nonprofits” is addressed. Raffa’s Marketing Coordinator, Rachel Caldwell, and ABCD & Company’s Partner, Durecia Moorer highlight how hiring millennials in the nonprofit sector can be beneficial in a multitude of ways.

    Some of the topics observed include:

    • Positive aspects about nonprofits hiring millennials
    • How millennials can make an impact within their organization
    • Why millennials should look into positions within nonprofits rather than a more corporate environment
    • How to make the move from a corporate environment to the nonprofit sector
    • How to retain millennials at your organization

    Durecia notes different opportunities for nonprofits to offer millennials as incentives including networking functions such as happy hours, a decent salary, and the ability to work from home. Millennials, Baby Boomers, and other generations should be able to collaborate in a cohesive manner and generate ideas that may not have been thought of initially.

    Ultimately, an abundance of opportunities present themselves (to both the millennials themselves as well as to other generations) through the hiring of younger individuals.

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  • 9/28/2017 Ep. 20 – How Boards Prepare for and Manage Executive Transition

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, executive transition is discussed in depth. To explore more deeply how board leaders are preparing for the inevitability of executive transition, this podcast features a discussion between Tom Adams and two board leaders who recently led their organization through an executive transition. Jean Hochron served as […]

    PodcastCoverArtIn this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, executive transition is discussed in depth. To explore more deeply how board leaders are preparing for the inevitability of executive transition, this podcast features a discussion between Tom Adams and two board leaders who recently led their organization through an executive transition. Jean Hochron served as the Search Committee Chair when the National Health Care for the Homeless Council completed its transition and search last year. Jean had also served as Board Chair. Jim Hastings is the current Board Chair for the Literacy Council of Montgomery County. As Chair, Jim served on the Transition and Search Committee during two executive transitions over the past four years.

    Executive transitions are inevitable. Sometimes they are expected; sometimes not. Regardless of the circumstances, boards are asked to step up and lead in very unique and important ways when an executive transition occurs. Sometimes glibly, we say the board’s most important duty (or high up there) is to hire the executive. There is more to the story. What this really means is the board is responsible for ensuring great leadership for the organization over time.

    Ensuring great leadership means more than placing an ad, doing some interviews and hiring an executive. Boards tend to err in one of two extremes when faced with executive transition – either panic and act like the sky is falling because the beloved executive is leaving, or nonchalantly go about quickly picking a successor like this is just any ordinary hire. It is not an ordinary hire or process.

    TIPS FOR BOARD LEADERS

    Based on the experience of Jean and Jim as board leaders of a transition and search and on Raffa’s extensive experience working with boards, here are six tips for board leaders who want to be ready when executive transition happens:

    1. Start early and revisit annually – The National Health Care for the Homeless Council transition was of a long-tenured founder of the organization. The board and executive were in discussions about his plans many years before the transition occurred. Jean Hochron commented on how important it was that 3 years before the transition they had taken the time to develop a written succession policy which detailed who would be on the Transition and Search Committee, how staff would be involved, and who made what decisions. In addition, the executive and managers developed back-up plans and looked at what actions were needed to make the organization ready for the transition. Once you have a succession policy and emergency plans, revisit them and your organizational sustainability annually.

    2.Pay attention to the culture and guiding principles of the organization – For the Literacy Council, the Board and the interim executive recognized a need to move from an informal way of operating that worked for their previous executive to more defined operating procedures. Through the transition – from a long-tenured executive, to an internally promoted executive, to an interim executive, to the newly hired current executive – the Literacy Council has intentionally made much progress in shifting their culture. Over the years, the Health Care for the Homeless Council had developed a strong commitment to consensus decision making. It was important to honor this culture in how the new executive was selected and in establishing expectations for the new executive.

    3.Consider hiring an Interim Executive – The Literacy Council had an internal interim while the Board led its own search for the first successor. Unfortunately, the Board decided not to make an offer to any of the three finalists. Meanwhile, the internal interim had proven her ability, was approached, and agreed to take the position. After two years she received a great offer at another organization and left. A colleague suggested to Jim Hastings that they consider an interim executive and told him about a network of Interim Executives serving the Washington DC region. Jim explained: “Our interim was exactly what we needed. She built on the work of our departing executive and rapidly advanced our processes and systems. We were a stronger and more attractive organization to candidates as a result. And the cost was not significantly more than our normal executive salary. Prior to this experience, I did not know this service existed and I highly recommend it to boards with that need.”

    4.Consider retaining consulting assistance – Both the Literacy Council and the Health Care for the Homeless Council decided to hire a consulting firm to assist with the transition and search. For the Literacy Council, Hastings explains: “We spent hundreds of hours of volunteer time trying to do this ourselves the first time and were unsuccessful. Having an external consultant both to be a thought partner and to do the leg work of finding the candidates we needed was worth the cost.” Hochron added: “We are a national membership organization and operate primarily via conference call and email, which made the search process somewhat complicated.  I was preparing for my own retirement and stepped forward to chair the Search Committee.  But I had neither the time nor skills to manage all of the details of a national search.  Having a consultant who knew and understood the process and who supported our culture was critical and a wise use of our resources.”  The National Council tapped its reserves to pay for costs associated with the search.  The Literacy Council was able to secure a grant after it had hired the consultant so it had minimal out of pocket costs.

    5.Engage and communicate often with all stakeholders, especially the staff – Transitions make boards and staff anxious. The staff wonders if the board really understands enough to hire a successor. Some of the board wonders if the Search Committee has too much authority. Being clear about roles, as well as how and when the full Board and staff will be involved, is key to success. For the Health Care for the Homeless Council, Hochron had regularly scheduled calls with the retiring executive and management team to make sure staff were engaged and had real-time information about the status of the search. This investment in communication and engagement is key to both the board and staff having full confidence in the decision.

    6.Invest in onboarding and the first years of a new executive – There are amazing opportunities to move an organization forward under new leadership. This is not a criticism of the past, but rather an acknowledgement of how quickly the environment and the needs of an organization change. A new executive working with an engaged board and staff can facilitate the needed changes without disrupting the secret sauce of what is working. This begins with the board paying attention to how it onboards the new executive and how the board, new executive, and staff intentionally advance their agreed upon change agenda over the first couple years of the executive’s tenure.

    Preparing for executive transition is a key and ongoing role for board leaders. The tips above are intended to help guide investment in that important duty.

    For more information on Raffa’s succession and executive transition services including this and other podcasts, a just-published case study on internal succession in Nonprofit Quarterly, click here. For more on these and related topics, read The Nonprofit Leadership Transition and Development Guide by Tom Adams available on Amazon.com. To hear this and other Raffa podcasts, click here.

     

     

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  • 8/30/2017 Ep. 19 – Cloud Security: Extending Beyond 4 Walls

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Nate Solloway, Systems Engineer/Outsourced IT Manager at Raffa and Martin Nash, Senior Vice President and Director of Information Security at EagleBank, discuss cyber security in the cloud from multiple perspectives. These include (but are not limited to) the cloud’s definition, its positive components, as well as […]

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Nate Solloway, Systems Engineer/Outsourced IT Manager at Raffa and Martin Nash, Senior Vice President and Director of Information Security at EagleBank, discuss cyber security in the cloud from multiple perspectives. These include (but are not limited to) the cloud’s definition, its positive components, as well as potential risks it poses.

    podcast image with logo

    Nate Solloway and Martin Nash

    Solloway and Nash agree early on that the general understanding of the cloud is that “it is out there” somewhere and usually has an affiliation with the internet. However, no one can seem to agree on a singular definition. While this might be the case, our hosts indicate that more and more of the population is beginning to gain a general understanding of the cloud. It is recommended to sit down with your organization, agree upon how the cloud can help, and then to move forward with this in mind.

    Oftentimes an organization will use a provider to store information through cloud security. In this case, an organization must consider how much they trust this provider and do their due diligence to identify if this provider is reliable.

    Data breaches are discussed within this episode as well, and Solloway and Nash touch upon how they can change as a result of cloud services. The hosts recognize that “everyone should have a data breach plan.”

    As the episode continues, vulnerabilities such as passwords and ransomware are discussed. The hosts identify potential ways to avoid conflict and to look out for suspicious behavior. Nash uses an interesting analogy relating to theft in houses in order to relate cyber threats to more commonly known ones.

    Finally, a large theme is presented throughout: while the cloud offers immense support, organizations should be aware of risks from players looking to gain information from weak targets who pose as the easiest opportunity.

    Want to hear more? Join Nate Solloway and Martin Nash for a complimentary seminar on October 5th, 2017 in Washington, DC entitled “Mitigating Cybersecurity and Cyber Fraud Risk in Your Organization.” Click here to register.

    Questions about anything mentioned in this podcast? Contact Nate Solloway at nsolloway@raffa.com.

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  • 7/27/2017 Ep. 18 – Effective Leadership: How to Achieve and Maintain It

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Managing Director of Raffa’s Search, Transition and Planning Department, Karen Schuler speaks again with CEO of Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, Tony Cancelosi about leadership effectiveness and what it takes to achieve it.

    In this episode of the Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast, Managing Director of Raffa’s Search, Transition and Planning Department, Karen Schuler speaks again with CEO of Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, Tony Cancelosi about leadership effectiveness and what it takes to achieve it.

    Karen Schuler and Tony Cancelosi

    Cancelosi indicates a number of key aspects that have proven to make a successful leader. He identifies that leaders must recognize the “things you have to fix” within an organization from an early stage in one’s leadership role.

    A common misconception that CEOs tend to make is that one must make all changes at the same time. Through a profound analogy to Lego toys, Cancelosi indicates that it is necessary to analyze and build, rather than to change everything in one go-around.

    Image and reputation building is also addressed within this episode. Cancelosi notes that internal infrastructure is imperative to growth as well as effective communication with all staff members. Overall commitment to the organization is essential.

    For further questions or concerns, please email ecrowley@raffa.com.

    Want more from Karen and Tony? Catch up on their previous podacsts, “Sustaining Mission Impact: How Do Great Organizations Stay Great?” and “So, What Makes Great Organizations “Great” Anyway?”.

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  • 6/26/2017 Ep 17. – Leader Development and Succession Planning: Building to Last

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Tom Adams discusses how leader development and succession planning go together. With Julie Meyer, the Executive Director of the Next Step Public Charter School in Washington DC and Rachael Gibson, a senior consultant with Raffa, you will learn the benefits of both.

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Tom Adams discusses how leader development and succession planning go together. With Julie Meyer, the Executive Director of the Next Step Public Charter School in Washington DC and Rachael Gibson, a senior consultant with Raffa, you will learn the benefits of both.

    Rachael Gibson, Tom Adams, and Julie Meyer

    Some boards and management teams are ready when a major leadership transition occurs. Some are not.  The difference has huge consequences for the organization. Boards and staff who are surprised by leadership transitions face both potential disruptions to the organization and unnecessary anxiety for board and staff. Services and mission usually suffer.

    Boards and staff who prepare for leadership transition are poised to adjust and adapt so there is minimal to no negative consequence for mission work. To the contrary, for organizations who prepare well, leadership transition often advances mission capacity. And prepared organizations have leaders with less anxiety and are less likely to experience undesired resignations and turnover.

    Ongoing and intentional attention to succession planning and leadership continuity is key for nonprofits and for-profits to succeed and be better prepared for leadership transitions. Succession planning can mean different things to different leaders. It is helpful to agree on what your organization means. It also works best, as noted by last month’s podcast guest Vince Keane of Unity Health Services, when the focus of succession planning is the organization and not exclusively about the executive (click here).

    What can boards and managers do to prepare for leadership transitions? Drawing from experience with many organizations and transitions, we have identified three paths that seem to work. Our June podcast with Julie Meyer, Executive Director of The Next Step Public Charter School in Washington, DC, and Rachael Gibson, a senior consultant with Raffa who supported the Next Step Board and managers in succession planning, illustrates these three paths.

    1. The executive and board have decided they need each other and are committed to being effective partners to lead the organization together. The Next Step Charter School grew over 12 years with Julie as executive from serving 75 students to a day and evening program serving 400 students. Over those years, the Board’s role evolved from minimal functioning to a governing board fully engaged and co-leading the development of the school with Julie and the management team.

    The development of an effective board-executive partnership is not an accident. Success requires an executive who believes a strong board is in both the organizations and her best interest. It also requires board leaders who are willing to learn about their roles, adhere to boundaries and agreements about roles, and be open to change in the board-executive relationship as the organization matures.

    2.  The executive and the board are deliberate about leader development and the investments required to fully engage and develop both the management team and the board. Successful businesses, large and small, invest heavily in leader development because it is profitable. For example, of the last few CEOs of UPS, one started his career there as a truck driver and another as a part-time employee in the warehouse. As nonprofits, we sometimes struggle to decide to invest time and money in leader development.

    The Next Step executive and board decided five years ago to expand the management team from the executive and two principals to a group of six. Meyer explains the reason for this investment this way: “We had grown rapidly and the siloed approach of each principal paying attention only to their school was limiting our programming and administrative capacity. To serve our students well, we needed a leadership team with additional and different skills and a commitment to the whole school. Besides increasing the team through hires and promotions, the board supported me in engaging an external coach to work with us individually and as a team. This paid great dividends in helping us shape our culture around leadership and how we led the school. The Board leaders took similar actions to add needed skills and connections to the Board and in paying attention to nurturing and development of board leadership for the future.”

    3.  Succession planning is ongoing. Leadership transition planning starts early. Meyer comments: “Our Board and I began talking about succession planning three years ago.  I attended Raffa’s Next Steps workshop (not related to Charter School) (OR “name coincidental”) where my thinking about succession, sustainability and transition was broadened. As I debriefed with the Board, we agreed we ought to make succession planning a priority. I had no imminent plan to leave my position, but also knew I would not stay there for 20 years. I knew the school would need fresh leadership not too far in the future. I was glad the Board saw succession planning as important for the organization and not solely about me. We considered doing this planning on our own without help. Wisely, I think, we decided not to do it alone. We got a much richer and more useful product as a result.”

    Succession planning in this situation involved both the Board and the management team. Rachael Gibson, lead consultant explains: “We started with the management team. We asked each member to identify their key functions and relationships and who might carry them out if they were out for an unplanned absence. The managers found this very helpful in thinking about their jobs and the people who reported to them. In a school where absences directly impact students, the managers quickly saw the benefits from this work and embraced it. Similarly, the Board was pleased to see the results from the work of the managers and did their own work to spell out processes for a planned or unplanned departure of the executive.”

    Meyer added: “These conversations about how we handle my planned departure when it occurs gave the Board a great opportunity to begin thinking about their choices when the time came to fill my position. So earlier this year when I advised the Board I would be exiting my position in 2018, they had these earlier discussions and a written succession policy to guide them in planning my transition with me.”

    There are no guarantees in any transition. From a risk management perspective, leaders and organizations who consistently pay attention to leadership transitions increase the odds of smoother transitions and reduce the likelihood of drama and trauma for the board, staff and those served.

    For more information on Raffa’s succession and executive transition services including this and other podcasts, a just-published case study on internal succession in Nonprofit Quarterly, click here. For more on these and related topics, read The Nonprofit Leadership Transition and Development Guide by Tom Adams available on Amazon.com. To hear this and other Raffa podcasts, click here.


    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

    ituneslogoSubscribe now via iTunes!

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  • 5/24/2017 Ep 16. – Overcoming Resistance to Succession Planning: Broadening the Lens

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode Tom Adams speaks with Vince Keane, President and CEO of Unity Health Care about overcoming resistance to succession planning.

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode Tom Adams speaks with Vince Keane, President and CEO of Unity Health Care about overcoming resistance to succession planning.

    Tom Adams and Vince Keane

    Vince Keane has led Unity Health Center in Washington DC for almost twenty-eight years. From an initial focus on health care for homeless individuals and families, Unity has grown from a $4m operation to $100m. Three years ago, Vince and his Board and the executive team began succession planning.

    Vince observed about this process: “As a federally qualified health center, I knew we were expected to have a succession plan. Yet the topic made both my executive team and Board very anxious. Over time we all got more comfortable talking about the need for leader development and continuity. The biggest contributor to feeling more comfortable was the shift of focus from CEO leadership succession to organizational leadership succession.”

    A retired CEO in the community development field recently led a workshop for peer executives on succession planning. He encouraged them all to get started early – 3 to 5 years before departure – on succession planning. He admitted being unable to do that during his retirement because he was reluctant to let go and trust the Board with something that impacted him so personally.

    Shifting the focus to organizational succession does not remove an executive’s concern about planning for retirement or moving on. What it does do, when done well, is to broaden the conversation and make it about how the mission of the organization will continue. When focusing on the board leaders, executive team and staff for sustained success it is a much different discussion than how we keep our CEO here as long as possible or encourage them to plan for succession. If there are performance concerns about a CEO or other leader or a factor that makes concern about premature departure real, these concerns are best addressed before succession planning is launched.

    There are numerous reasons why organizations working for change and a better world are moving away from relying on a single hero leader or small core team to get everything done. Too many organizations have felt the pain of over-reliance on one or two leaders and had shocking wake-up calls when they departed. The case for building a leadership team among the board and staff is quite compelling. Seasoned leaders know it makes sense because they are tired and want to lighten their load. Millennial age leaders embrace shared leadership because it is the air they grew up in and what they expect. It is more fun and supports the balanced life they seek.

    Our words sometimes trigger emotions that block progress. Conversations about household finances and budgets can cause a host of other issues. Succession planning is like that. Some leaders never get beyond the word. Esther Newman, the former executive of Leadership Montgomery, committed to developing an emergency backup plan for herself and her team at a succession planning workshop. Two years later she called to say she was stuck and needed help getting her emergency plan done. After a couple of hours of discussion and the plan was mostly completed, she smiled and observed: “My goodness, I don’t know why I waited so long to get to this.”

    Esther, like many of us, can get distracted when a task looks overwhelming or might involve something we would rather avoid. When all the leaders of an organization decide together to focus on how to prepare for planned and unplanned leader transitions, this work is not about any individual. Success becomes a shared goal.

    Here are five actions that will help your organization advance organizational succession planning and get beyond some of the barriers most organizations face:

    1. Do a “trust check” to make sure the relationships among the Board, CEO, and management team are working. If there are performance or communications issues or a culture that does not support the focus on organizational succession, call time out and address these issues before launching succession planning.
    2. Enroll a core team of champions for expanding the leader development culture and the attention to leader continuity for the organization. Consider learning more about organizational succession planning or getting some coaching on the topic for the CEO, involved board leaders and managers if needed to make the commitment to this process more solid.
    3. Review what is already in place and decide what will deepen the roots and impact of your succession planning. If this is the first effort, set limited goals and look for an experienced guide to support the process. Commit to completing the first phase in three to four months so it does not drag on and become an energy drain. If follow-up to past efforts, decide how to best make leader development and succession planning part of your annual schedule.
    4. Pay attention to what is considered the basics of organizational succession planning:
      • Written emergency backup plans for the CEO and managers which prepare for unplanned absences by appointing a temporary stand-in;
      • Written succession policy that lays out the organization’s commitment and philosophy of leader development and how planned CEO transitions will occur;
      • Expand attention to leader and talent development for board and staff, with emphasis on positions that are critical to mission and organizational sustainability;
      • If a leadership transition is imminent in next few years, make sure there is agreement on timing and process for filling the position and completing a successful hand-off.
    5. Make attention to organizational leader succession part of your annual strategic and sustainability planning, so it is natural and expected.

    Vince Keane added: “Everyone working in a nonprofit gives generously of themselves to get the mission done. We owe it to each other to make sure the mission and work we have been doing continues. Attention to organizational succession and sustainability makes that more likely.”

    For more information on Raffa’s succession and executive transition services including this and other podcasts, a just-published case study on internal succession in Nonprofit Quarterly, click here. For more on these and related topics, read The Nonprofit Leadership Transition and Development Guide by Tom Adams available on Amazon.com. To hear this and other Raffa podcasts, click here.


    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

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  • 4/26/2017 Ep 15. – Sustaining Mission Impact: How Do Great Organizations Stay Great?

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast episode, Karen Schuler, Managing Director of Search, Transition & Planning, discusses sustaining mission impact with President and CEO of Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, Tony Cancelosi. To delve into the topic, they reference key aspects such as origin, leadership, culture, and board.

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. Podcast episode, Karen Schuler, Managing Director of Search, Transition & Planning, discusses sustaining mission impact with President and CEO of Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind, Tony Cancelosi. To delve into the topic, they reference key aspects such as origin, leadership, culture, and board.

    Tony Cancelosi and Karen Schuler

    To begin the podcast, Schuler and Cancelosi discuss how sustainability has roots in the environment and ecology. In order to veer away from this definition of definition, Cancelosi references to:

    • start focusing on organizational sustainability
    • dig deeper into mission sustainability
    • dive into mission impact sustainability

    Columbia Lighthouse for the Blind was established 117 years ago and Cancelosi believes that the organization’s ability to “hire good people,” listen to employees wants and needs, and effectively deal with change has led to the organization’s success in sustaining mission impact. “Leaders who do not listen will eventually be surrounded by people who have nothing to say,” says Cancelosi.

    As the conversation continues, Cancelosi discusses that in order to have any kind of sustainability an organization, key items are necessary. He references taking the following into consideration:

    • internal controls
    • operational efficiency
    • risk management
    • viability and reporting process

    Throughout this episode, Schuler and Cancelosi dive into the importance of maintaining relevance, providing strong culture, and understanding the human aspect of change in reference to sustaining mission impact. An important takeaway is that sustainability will not happen without really working for it.

    “Do the thing even when no one is watching. It’s called integrity,” noted Cancelosi.

    If you enjoyed this podcast, listen to the prequel “So, What Makes Great Organizations “Great” Anyway?


    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

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  • 3/30/2017 Ep 14. – Preparing for Executive Transition: The Board’s Role and Perspective

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode Tom Adams speaks with Pamela Gilbert, Chair of the American Antitrust Institute’s Board of Directors about the board’s roles and challenges in preparing for and successfully leading an executive transition.

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode Tom Adams speaks with Pamela Gilbert, Chair of the American Antitrust Institute’s Board of Directors about the board’s roles and challenges in preparing for and successfully leading an executive transition.

    march-podcast.png

    Tom Adams and Pamela Gilbert

     

    For more information on executive transitions read our blog post associated with this podcast, Six Tips for Boards: Preparing for Executive Transition.


    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

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  • 2/28/2017 Ep 13. – The DNA of a Highly Engaged Culture

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Michelle Hailey speaks with Dr. Elizabeth Scott and Dr. Linda Klonsky from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. They offer listeners a look at the components that help organizations thrive with constructive cultures, a better understanding as to why it’s important to consider addressing culture issues, and the benefits of being proactive in […]

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Michelle Hailey speaks with Dr. Elizabeth Scott and Dr. Linda Klonsky from the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. They offer listeners a look at the components that help organizations thrive with constructive cultures, a better understanding as to why it’s important to consider addressing culture issues, and the benefits of being proactive in dealing with culture changes.

    Dr. Linda Klonsky, Dr. Elizabeth Scott, and Michelle Hailey

    Dr. Linda Klonsky, Dr. Elizabeth Scott, and Michelle Hailey

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    To learn more, please join us for the repeat performance of the DNA of a Highly Engaged Culture: How to Proactively and Successfully Cultivate Change within Your Organization seminar on Thursday, June 15th at 12pm in DC.

    Organization Culture Inventory Diagram

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    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

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  • 1/26/2017 Ep 12. – Preparing for Executive Transition: The Executive’s Perspective

    Underestimating the complexity of an executive transition is easy. To some Board and staff members, it looks simple and straight forward. Executive A decides to leave and informs Board; Board recruits and hires Executive B. Executive A hands leadership to Executive B. What’s the fuss? Unfortunately, as experienced leaders know, executive transitions stretch and challenge […]

    Underestimating the complexity of an executive transition is easy. To some Board and staff members, it looks simple and straight forward. Executive A decides to leave and informs Board; Board recruits and hires Executive B. Executive A hands leadership to Executive B. What’s the fuss? Unfortunately, as experienced leaders know, executive transitions stretch and challenge everyone involved – Executive, Board, and staff.

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Keith Peterson who retired as CEO of PennMar Human Services in 2013 and Louvenia Williams who is retiring this year as founding executive of Edgewood/Brookland Family Support Collaborative, share their perspective on their transitions with Tom Adams, Director at Raffa.

    Tom Adams, Louvenia Williams, and Keith Peterson

    Tom Adams, Louvenia Williams, and Keith Peterson

     

     

     

     

     

    Here are some key points Williams and Peterson made about executive transition.

    The discussion focuses on three dimensions – personal, professional and organizational. As in real life, these and most executives are much more comfortable attending to organizational issues than their personal and professional planning.

    Both executives emphasized how being concerned about the future of the organization is personal. Williams observed: “I am the founding executive of this organization. It has been my baby for over 20 years. This is bigger for me than the Board finding a new executive. There is a lot of care and feeding needed to plan this hand-off well and to ensure that what we built together lasts and continues to do good work.”

    Peterson described the pressure he felt of being responsible for services to over 500 individuals with intellectual disabilities and their families and the staff who relied on PennMar for their livelihood. “I knew that a poor transition put the people served and the staff in a precarious situation. So I was deeply committed to a positive transition so that services were not interrupted and quality sustained.”

    The two executives offered several examples of what makes executive transition personally and professionally challenging and complex:

    • As an executive, accepting the anxiety of letting go of control and influence as the Board and management team step up and make decisions more often independent of the executive.
    • Finding time to plan for what life after being an executive looks and feels like. One day you have an important mission and are in charge and the next day you are not. That is a big change and benefits from attention to what will give purpose and sustain meaningful relationships after leaving the executive position.
    • Deciding how much to encourage potential internal candidates for the executive position and how to determine what is and is not your role in working with the Board as they consider how to respond to internal candidate(s).

    Peterson emphasized the importance of ensuring the Board gets appropriate help during the transition process. “As I began thinking I would retire in two to three years, I searched for books and resources on succession planning and executive transition and looked for resources for the Board and myself. I considered it part of my responsibility to make sure the Board had the resources needed to lead a successful transition.”

    Denial is a normal reaction to uncomfortable times and feelings. Letting go of a position of authority and respect is a big decision for an executive. For many, it feels overwhelming and somewhat risky and becomes easy to put off. Williams and Peterson suggested the following to executives thinking about a transition:

    • Begin planning early. Two to four years before your departure is not too soon, particularly if you have a long tenure and are retiring or moving out of executive leadership.
    • Look for safe places to network with peers and get educated about what to expect during transition and what is and is not your role. (Both executives commented that Raffa’s two day Next Steps workshops for executives are great for learning and networking. Click here for more information on Next Steps)
    • Strengthen your partnership with the Board. Review and clarify roles in preparing and completing the transition.
    • Have some idea what will give you meaning and the personal connections you need after you leave. (Peterson chose to join several boards after retirement as a way to continue to contribute from his experience; Williams looks forward to continuing her role as a community leader and advocate.)
    • Let go gracefully and try not to take too much personally.

    For the executive, there are three dimensions to a successful transition: personal, professional and organizational. While hard to do, odds for a successful transition increase when all three dimensions are addressed.

    For more information on Raffa’s succession and executive transition services, click here. For more on these and related topics, read The Nonprofit Leadership Transition and Development Guide by Tom Adams available on Amazon.com.


    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

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  • 11/30/2016 Ep. 11 – Connecting Accounting, Financial Management and Mission Results – Where to Start in Considering an Accounting Review

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Raffa’s Tom Adams spoke with Julie Jones, Partner and Jean Gilbert, Director in Raffa’s Managed Accounting Services Practice as they offer listeners a framework for considering how accounting and financial systems are supporting mission results and questions to consider in developing an action plan for change.         For […]

    PodcastCoverArtIn this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Raffa’s Tom Adams spoke with Julie Jones, Partner and Jean Gilbert, Director in Raffa’s Managed Accounting Services Practice as they offer listeners a framework for considering how accounting and financial systems are supporting mission results and questions to consider in developing an action plan for change.

    Tom Adams, Julie Jones, Jean Gilbert

    Tom Adams, Julie Jones, Jean Gilbert

     

     

     

     

    For more on this topic read the article, Are Your Accounting Operations Aligned with Your Impact Mission, by Julie Jones.


    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

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  • 10/26/2016 Ep 10. – Stewarding Investments and Reserves: Lessons for Nonprofit Boards and Financial Managers

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Raffa’s Tom Adams spoke with Dennis Gogarty, President of Raffa Wealth Management, as he shares lessons from the 2016 SONI report, observations on trends since the report began and practical steps board leaders and executives can take to ensure good stewardship of investments.   Read Tom Adams and […]

    PodcastCoverArt

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Raffa’s Tom Adams spoke with Dennis Gogarty, President of Raffa Wealth Management, as he shares lessons from the 2016 SONI report, observations on trends since the report began and practical steps board leaders and executives can take to ensure good stewardship of investments.

    dennis-gogarty

    Dennis Gogarty

     

    Read Tom Adams and Dennis Gogarty’s blog post, Stewarding Investments Well: What Boards and Executives Need to Know, for more on this topic.


    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

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  • 9/28/2016 Ep 9. – Strategic Planning: What is the Best Approach?

    In this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Raffa’s Tom Adams spoke with Denice Hinden, President of Managance Consulting and Coaching and Rachael Gibson, Senior Consultant with Raffa P.C. as they discuss selecting an approach to strategic planning that adds the most value to your organization.

    PodcastCoverArtIn this Lead. Learn. Thrive. podcast episode, Raffa’s Tom Adams spoke with Denice Hinden, President of Managance Consulting and Coaching and Rachael Gibson, Senior Consultant with Raffa P.C. as they discuss selecting an approach to strategic planning that adds the most value to your organization.

     

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    Denise Hinden and Rachael Gibson

    Denice and Rachael are experienced strategic planning consultants.

    Read Tom Adams’ blog post, The When, Why and How of Strategic Planning, for more on this topic.


    The Lead. Learn. Thrive podcast series grew out of our Raffa Learning Community effort and features interviews with interesting nonprofit and private sector leaders and those who help them Do More. If you would like to suggest a topic or a guest for an upcoming episode, please email jimena@raffa.com and include “podcast” in the email subject line.

    ituneslogoSubscribe now via iTunes!

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